The Importance of Art Collectors

March 08, 2018

Lithograph #3 from the series “Lithograph II” by Joan Miro

By Chelsea Reed

Did you know that most museums and art galleries wouldn’t be here today without the support of art collectors? It's true! Thanks to these individuals' fervent love for the arts, the art industry lives on for our future generations to enjoy. What does it take to be an art collector, and how have art collectors made a difference in the world we know today? Let's uncover the answers to these questions and more about the importance of art collectors in the art business world.

Notable Art Collectors in History

Young Artist is an original wood cut by Irving AmenArt collectors and artists have worked together for centuries. The Medici family, for example, provided significant contributions to Michelangelo's sculptures and other artists' commissioned works during the Italian Renaissance. King Charles I of England was a passionate art patron who made important additions to the Royal Family's art collection. Industrial tycoon Andrew Carnegie was also an avid supporter of the arts. He dedicated his vast art collection to educating the public by starting his own contemporary art museum in 1895. This museum would become the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh that we know today.

Royal rulers and rich individuals weren't the only art collectors who changed history, however. Let’s take a look at Herb and Dorothy Vogel, a husband and wife team who made a big impact in New York City's art landscape.

From Ordinary to Extraordinary 

Like many residents in downtown New York, Herb and Dorothy live in an apartment with modest incomes. Herb was a postal worker, while Dorothy was a librarian. Both of them have shared a love for art since their early married days. They began collecting art in the 1960s, and since then have not looked back. Herb and Dorothy would buy what they could with their incomes, and they always selected artwork they could take home in taxis and subways. Little did they know, their collection would fill their whole apartment and the Vogels would own over 4,000 pieces of art!

Wanting to share their art with the public, Herb and Dorothy decided to donate their entire art collection to the National Gallery of Art. They continue to grow a new art collection in their New York apartment to this day.

Art Collecting is for Everyone!

Does the idea of art collecting sound fun to you, but you're not sure where to begin? It's easy! Any individual who owns as few as two or three paintings is considered to be an art collector. Art collectors can choose to select artwork by artist name, art style, subject theme, or any kind of piece that strikes their fancy. How you collect the artwork is really up to you. And, as you can see from Herb and Dorothy’s story, the sky’s the limit! If you have space on your wall, then you can collect art and take part in preserving the arts for future generations to enjoy.

Seaside Art Gallery is an excellent starting point for art collectors like you. The owner Melanie Smith is a certified art appraiser who is well versed in helping art collectors find the perfect piece that fits. You can find her and other experienced staff members at Seaside Art Gallery

Chelsea Reed is a freelance copywriter. She writes articles, blogs, websites and online content from her base in North Carolina.





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